The Benefits of BIM

19 Dec The Benefits of BIM

http://www.bigleaguekickball.com/about/ buy Soma overnight free delivery Over recent years, the UK Construction industry has moved forward with Building Information Modelling (BIM), quickly making it an everyday tool for the efficient specification of building products. The requirement for BIM Level 2 compliance will be 2 years old in April 2018 and here Chris Lister, General Manager with JET Cox, looks at how BIM is benefitting the rooflighting industry.

Since its introduction, BIM has transformed construction methods worldwide for those using it and is set to provide unrivalled opportunities to further streamline the relationships between design teams, contractors and clients. It also offers reduced costs via tighter control and increased efficiency. JET Cox has been manufacturing roofing daylight and ventilation systems since 1954, and fully understands the need to embrace change in an ever-developing landscape.

It’s a fact that all technology is moving forward at a substantial rate – and it’s important that we as building product manufacturers keep up. It’s reported that 54% of architects are now using BIM regularly on their projects, with positivity towards the concept continuing to grow, and three quarters believing that BIM will be dominant in the future of project information*. A statistic we can’t afford to ignore.

The technology to facilitate BIM is well established, however the industry’s capability to create and utilise models to their full potential is still in its infancy. Despite the 2016 deadline, production of BIM objects by the manufacturing industry is still relatively low. Those manufacturers who have invested are starting to see uptake by progressive practices and sole practitioners alike, but for the majority of the construction industry BIM is still a misnomer, known to have importance but still on the ‘to do’ list.

Soma no prescription USA FedEx shipping Getting our heads around the software

The development of specific modelling packages such as REVIT, alongside the established CAD and 3D modelling suites continues, however, use of these packages requires a change in mindset and technique from architects, engineers and technicians producing them. Furthermore, manufacturers need to understand the modeller’s requirements, to best provide the building blocks for their projects.

In order to assist with this communication, the government coordinated BIM Task Group has been directing input from bodies such as the Construction Products Association (CPA) and The Chartered Institute of Building Engineers (CIBSE) in developing a common language. This will ultimately take the form of a software package called LexiCon, drawing on all information formats in current use including National Building Specifications (NBS) and Construction Operations Building Information Exchange (COBie) formats.

As with all advances in technology, the pace of development typically produces some disharmony with the range of applications, exceeding the frameworks for control. BIM is no exception. Whilst BIM appears to be settling with REVIT as the standard, supplemented with IFC files, the development underway on the language and definition of information contained within the objects is incomplete. Work by the central bodies to define and regulate universal terms is behind schedule and whilst a common data environment exists, the proposed LexiCon software is still unavailable 12 months after the BIM level 2 compliance date.

As a consequence of this, the appointment of Relevant Authorities, the discipline specific bodies from industry being set up to moderate data sets, has been delayed. Whilst this has not stopped the creation and use of BIM objects by the industry, it does bring into question the ability of the Relevant Authorities to ultimately invigilate over the object data template production process.

NARM

In the case of rooflights and daylit ventilation systems, the Relevant Authority is the National Association of Rooflight Manufacturers. NARM’s position, as a body containing over 90% of the UK’s rooflight product manufacturers, is central to the production of rooflight BIM objects and their use going forward. With collaborative work already underway to scope out data templates for new objects, NARM is awaiting the launch of the LexiCon software to complete its work. This will allow all manufacturers to use the standardised framework to produce or further develop their existing objects for use in new Building Information Models.

The prevalence of UK based architects in the international building design arena has already seen UK manufactured products being incorporated into new BIM designs around the world. This stems from individual manufacturers’ foresight and readiness, allowing UK designers to use their BIM objects to export UK product design around the world. These new tools are a simple extension of product details for specification in a new, all inclusive format.

Accessibility and Flexibility

Rooflight manufacturers need to continue to make information on their products readily available in the most usable formats and make the specification of their products as simple and as quick as possible.

In addition, the flexibility BIM brings is having a direct impact on the type and frequency of rooflights being specified. As project designs become more adventurous, 360 degree manoeuvrability around the 3D environment is bringing new possibilities for overhead natural daylight. Add to that the ability to easily share model information between project partners, risks can be pinpointed in the early stages thus reducing potentially costly reworking in detailed design, increasing the likelihood of rooflights remaining in completed projects.

In conclusion, the UK building product industry needs to keep capitalizing on new technology to ensure processes are continually improving. The result will be a well-organised sector, with inclusive systems that offer benefits at every stage of the construction process. BIM is a major part of that and we need to support the advantages it brings to individual companies and UK plc as a whole.

Download JET Cox BIM objects here

*Source – NBS BIM Report 2016